Just Hanging

Yesterday happened upon this colony hanging off a branch of a blueberry bush.

Yellow Necked Caterpillar

Yellow Necked Caterpillar Datana larvae

My research shows they have voracious appetites, so might have to relocate…

Now is the time to check your blueberries as recommended by NC State integrated pest management folks.

As the circle of life continues the caterpillars will become food for birds in the larvae stage before the get too hairy. They serve as hosts for Tachinid Flies.

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And a spider preparing a feast of the Headless Moth or Yellow Necked Datana moth in the fall.

Enjoy – Living the EntwinedLife!

Jayme B

NC Certified Environmental Educator

 

 

 

The Web We Weave

Walking through my Zone 8 Garden, pondering the web we weave…

Spider

My wise friend Hilda always cautions with a kind voice, “Be careful what you wish for…”
Like most things in life, an action causes a ripple not to be reversed.

Native Americans honored the spider long before Charlotte’s Web was penned or became a delightful film with the memorable, sound of Julia Robert’s soothing voice. I’m certain a whole generation of children left their screens in search of a Charlotte of their own, heading outside to explore!

“So it was that Spider wove the first primordial alphabet, as she had woven the dream of the world that had become manifest. Spider’s dream of the physical world had comer to fruition millions of years before.”

“Spider’s body is made like the number eight, cons of two lobe-like parts connected at the waist, and eight legs.  Spider is the symbol for the infinite possibilities of creation.  Her eight legs represent the four winds of change and the four directions on the medicine wheel.”

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“If Spider has dropped from her web into your cards today,”  (I prefer getting into nature and then looking up the animals/insects I encounter), “she may be telling you to create, create, create!” … from Medicine Cards by Jamie Sams & David Carson

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And so I shall!

Reminder: September 24 – 30, 2015 is Take A Child Outside Week

Enjoy – living the EntwinedLive!

Jayme B

NC Certified Environmental Educator

Philanthropic primum mobile

 

Native Places

There are places I remember…

One of them was a gem of a garden… the gentle breezes, the blowing table cloths,

Secret nooks captured  views… the knowledge that someone envisioned a plot of land and worked it for their delight and fascination…

Meet Frank Harmon…

His fascination with design, building, art, everything green is astounding!   It is comforting that he pulls along the roadside to do a quick watercolor of  Native Places weaving a sense of time, sense of place and the importance of honoring these Native Places… then shares them.

With all that is happening in the world, I wish more people spent time seeking time to reflect and think in a garden.

Time yields perspective – thank you Frank for this lovely piece…

 

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NATIVE PLACES
A COLLECTION OF THOUGHTS AND IMAGES BY FRANK HARMON

Gardening with Others

There’s been quite a ruckus in our town this summer about building a modern house in a historic garden district. Someone who lives across the street from the modern house sued the architect. The neighborhood is divided, pro and con, and nerves are getting pretty jangled, causing one opponent to say, “If this house is built, it will be the end of the Christmas Candlelight Tour!”

It’s time to sit in a garden.

A garden such as this one in Charlotte, North Carolina, planted by Elizabeth Lawrence over half a century ago. Lawrence grew several hundred plant species in a space about the size of a tennis court. She loved plants but her floral diversity was criticized. “I cannot bear for people to say (as they often do) that I am better at plant material than design. I cannot help it if I have to use my own well-designed garden as a laboratory, thereby ruining it as a garden,” she wrote. Yet visitors come from around the world to admire her garden.

Elizabeth Lawrence could have arranged her garden with plants that looked like her neighbors’. Instead, she spread a mosaic of flowers.

Read more about Elizabeth Lawrence .

Visit Frank at Native Places and Frank Harmon Architect, AIA.

 

Enjoy – living the EntwinedLife with Gratitude to know Frank!

Jayme B

NC Certified Environmental Educator

Garden Conservancy Regional Representative

JC Raulston Arboretum Volunteer

 

A piece of cake and a slice of pie.

Entwined Garden it is a Cake—a sheet cake—large and cut into sections.   The house designed by my engineer husband Phil is on an east west axis back to front and north to south. On the Solstices we have light streaming in across the floors… it is always a celebration!

Entwined home & garden

Facing West

The gardens evolved as therapy for my soul in the long years of construction—I needed color against the red clay and sense of purpose—fluid swaths to soften the edges—frosting on the cake.

Entwined Villa View

Entwined Garden South

It is there I always know where I am and what direction I am facing. Continue reading

Gratitude from down under

I awoke early—it was Saturday—the second one in March, in anticipation of a spring-like day. With the weather report crisp and a “to do list” a mile long, a whole glorious day planned in the garden to quench the cabin fever of a relentless winter.

There was something in the air.

Still under warm covers, I opened my eyes to the world through my I-Pad.   A Word Press notification introduced me to a wonderful story by a writer in Australia, Deb Hunt, a blog titled Snap Decision about gardening and loss of her Mum. Something I know all to well.

Next I perused GRATITUDE—which so inspired me.  Gratitude from down under. Continue reading

Open Days Progam—Finding Soul—The Yoga Garden

Tucked away below a rocky ridge, a stream slowly bends and flows carving a craggy plateau. Wildlife abounds—sounds of water on rocks, frogs chirping and birds twittering—a wildlife habitat—welcome to Peace and Harmony—Welcome to The Yoga Garden.

SithesYogaGarden Continue reading

Bloom Day – Entwined Gardens

Bloom Day!  Camera in hand, an opportunity to ponder… Above a double Kerria a share from my friend Deb.

A sweet little girl statue that once resided in ‘Big’s Garden in Chatham, Virginia – a gift from Big’s daughter Jane. Continue reading

Hellebore Time

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Under the oaks and pines

A plant grows mighty fine.

Evergreen, shades of pink, burgundy or lime

Blooming ever so sublime

Hurray—It’s Hellebore time!

My friend Kathy's yellow Hellebore peaking through the snow.

My friend Kathy’s yellow Hellebore peaking through the snow.

Imagine, seeing this hopeful sign of spring—just out your window as winter’s wrath has driven you to wit’s end—peaking through the bareness of the last snow.

Or being able to cut and bring a variety of fascinating blooms inside…

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Having many forms—singles, semi-doubles, doubles, anemone-centered—and colors—it is easy to see why there are passionate breeders and collectors of this winter bloomer.

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Hellebores can be successfully grown in shade, but I have some also in sun;  They are drought tolerant and even the deer won’t nibble!   What is not to like?

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They can be cut for arrangements or floated in bowls indoor, or outside, to bring cheer in late winter and delight with hope of spring to come.

Stop by a good nursery and ask for them…  They grow in Zones 4-9.

Having Cabin Fever?   Saturday March 8,  is the last day of Hellebore Festival at Pine Knot Farms in Clarksville, Virginia… the weather is expected to be sunny and high 50’s… so go if you  are anywhere near by!   I have met folks from DC, South Carolina, Tennessee, North Carolina… all beaming with joy for making the journey, wagons filled with Hellebores, hardy Primrose, Hepatica – just to name a few things!

Entrance to Dick and Judy's Garden... Pine Knot Farms.

Entrance to Dick and Judy’s Garden… Pine Knot Farms.

Judith Knot Tyler and her Husband Dick have customers in 49 of the 50 states and will gladly ship!

Magical gardens to meander around their hand-built home.   Plenty of Hellebores and other woodland garden plants for sale.

More next week with tips from Judy Knot Tyler of Pine Knot Farms on tips for propagation and care.

Judith Knott and Dick Tyler
Pine Knot Farms
www.pineknotfarms.com
434-252-1990
434-252-0768 fax

Enjoy – living the  EntwinedLife

Jayme B

NC Certified Environmental Educator

Garden Conservancy Regional Representative

JC Raulston Arboretum Volunteer